Giant Shark Catfish - Paroon Shark Pangasius sanitwongsei

Giant Shark Catfish
Giant Shark Catfish
Paroon Shark Catfish
The Giant Shark Catfish, also called the Giant Pangasius Catfish and the Paroon (Shark), is native to main rivers of the Chao Phraya and Mekong basins in Indochina. It is a carnivore, as fond of meat as of fish, and it can grow to a massive 2.5 metres long. The adult has long, flowing dorsal (especially), pectoral and pelvic fins and black and white markings on the anal and tail fins. Although individuals can live for over 20 years, the species survival is now critically endangered, mainly through over-fishing but also through construction of dams since they migrate upstream to spawn.
Giant Shark Catfish
Giant Shark Catfish with Bala Shark Shark Catfish and Bala Shark.
Paroon Shark Catfish
Two fish of the same family from the same region are sometimes mistaken for the longer-finned Paroon: the Giant Mekong Catfish, Pangasianodon gigas, of main Mekong river channels, growing to some 3 metres, is one of the largest freshwater fish in the world. It is also critically endangered by over-harvesting and by dam constuction limiting spawning. The smaller Iridescent Shark Catfish, Pangasianodon hypophthalmus, also native to the Chao Phraya and Mekong basins, can grow to 1.3 metres long. Juveniles of the Iridescent are shiny with a lateral stripe but adults are grey.