Smooth-fronted Caiman Paleosuchus trigonatus

Smooth-fronted Caiman
Smooth-fronted Caiman
The Smooth-fronted Caiman, also called Schneider's Dwarf Caiman, is native to streams and rivers of much of the northern part of South America, mainly the Amazon and Orinoco Basins and especially near rapids and waterfalls. They suffer from pollution and hunting.
Smooth-fronted Caiman
Smooth-fronted Caiman
The top of the head and face are smooth and angular. Nostrils and eyes are above the waterline. It is a little larger than Cuivier's Dwarf Caiman.
Smooth-fronted Caiman
Schneider's Dwarf Caiman
Smooth-fronted Caiman
The light bars on the lower jaw make the teeth look longer. Males typically reach a length of some 2 metres (over 6 feet). Females are smaller.
Smooth-fronted Caiman
Schneider's Dwarf Caiman
Smooth-fronted Caiman
They are mainly crepuscular/nocturnal, territorial and solitary. Females nest in plant debris that they place on top of termite mounds to keep a constant incubating temperature. She guards the eggs until they hatch.