Red-brown Skipjack Athous haemorrhoidalis

There are several species of Click Beetle in the UK, all long, slender with tapering body and a hinge between the long thorax and abdomen. Also called Skipjacks, they are able to vault themselves into the air with a loud click. They do this for two reasons: to right themselves when they have fallen on their back or to startle and evade a predator.
They are vegetarian but their larvae (wireworms) can be a pest to root crops.
Red-brown Skipjack Click Beetle
Red-brown Skipjack Click Beetle
Red-brown Skipjack Click Beetle
The Red-brown Skipjack is native to much of Eurasia and is common in Britain. It is some 12-15mm long and has red-brown wing cases tapering at the back and a blackish extended thorax, both covered in fine hairs. The legs are brown. While the image above right is poor, it shows the scutellum knob that is a key part of the click mechanism. They are found in different countryside habitats.

Common Click Beetle Agriotes sputator

Common Click Beetle
Common Click Beetle
Common Click Beetle
The Common Click Beetle is native to most of the UK, to much of Europe (not far north) through to Central Asia and to part of North Africa. It is a dark reddish brown from head, extended thorax and tapered wing cases. Above centre shows the click lever mechanism on the scutellum to release the hinge. It is some 7-9mm long and is attracted to light.