Asian Mudskipper Periophthalmodon septemradiatus

Asian Mudskipper
Asian Mudskipper
Asian Mudskipper
This blue-spotted mudskipper with pale blue and red on his retractable first dorsal fin is thought to be the Asian Mudskipper, Periophthalmodon septemradiatus, native to brackish mangrove and estuarine coastal waters of the eastern Indian Ocean, from India to Indonesia. The Common Mudskipper, Periophthalmus kalolo, inhabits the region (East Africa to Samoa) but is not as colourful.
Asian Mudskipper
Asian Mudskipper
Asian Mudskipper
There are several species of mudskippers, all amphibious and living on tidal flats or in fresh or brackish coastal areas. They can (and seem to prefer to) breathe air through skin and mouth, as long as they can keep moist and keep water bubbles in their gills. Mudskippers use their modified pectoral and pelvic fins to "walk" or skip on land. They often behave more like amphibians than fish.
Asian Mudskipper
Asian Mudskipper
Asian Mudskipper
The "septemradiatus" refers to seven rays of the male's first dorsal fin which he raises in territorial disputes. It is one of the few fish known to communicate audibly when out of the water. The Asian Mudskipper grows to some 10cm long (the Common Mudskipper to 14cm). Unusually for fish, they can roll their eyes in the sockets to keep them moist (since fish don't blink). The eyes on the top of their head give nearly all round vision. They hide and breed in mud burrows in which they create an air pocket under the water by bringing in mouthfuls of surface air.