Iberian Ribbed Newt Pleurodeles waltl

Iberian Ribbed Newt
Iberian Ribbed Newt
The Iberian Ribbed Newt, also called the (Spanish) Sharp-ribbed Salamander, is native to deep ponds, cisterns and wells in the Iberian Peninsula and Moroccan Maghreb. They rarely leave the water and can grow to about foot (30cm) long. (The Iberian Newt, Lissotriton boscai, is a different species and genus.)
Iberian Ribbed Newt
Iberian Ribbed Newt
If under attack, their sharp ribs can pierce the tubercles along their flank and pierce a predator's mouth while secreting a stinging toxin. Their sides quickly heal and, like some other salamanders, they can also regenerate lost limbs and repair organ tissue. They have been the subject of many medical experiments particularly looking at their self-healing and regeneration abilities and also looking at the impact of weightlessness in space.
Their populations are in decline and near threatened mainly due to habitat drainage and pollution, invasive introduced bass and crayfish predating their eggs and even through road kill.