Konik Horse Equus ferus caballus (prev. Equus caballus gemelli)

Steppe Horses
Steppe Horses
Most or all of today's horse and pony breeds are descended from the Eurasian wild Tarpan, Equus ferus ferus, herds of which were prevalent on the steppes of Central Asia (and maybe Eastern Europe) in the early days of domestication of horses. Tarpans were extinct in the wild by the late 1800s and the last one died in captivity in Russia in 1909. (The above photos show today's domesticated, free-ranging horse herds on the Central Asian steppes in eastern Kazakhstan.)
Konik Horse
Konik Horse
Konik Horse
There have been two recent European attempts to recreate the characteristics of the ("Eurasian") Tarpan: the Polish Konik (Kon is Polish for horse; koniki is plural) and the German Heck Horse. Koniks are small horses (sometimes called ponies) with the size, dun coat and dark mane, tail and dorsal stripe of the Tarpans. They are also very hardy. However recent DNA studies have established that they are descended from the domestic horse.
Konik Horse
Konik Horse
Konik Horse
They are much hardier and more self-sufficient than other domestic horses, able to forage over grassland and woodland without human oversight and resistant to harsh climate conditions. Since they are able to eat coarse grass, sedges and rushes, they are particularly used in nature reserve conservation grazing where eating rank vegetation and dropping manure encourages wild flowers and bio-diversity.