Apple Snails Pomacea spp.

Apple Snails
Apple Snail
Apple Snail
The Apple Snail family has 6 genera, all freshwater snails living in ponds and waterways. They are unusual for snails in that they have a split chamber with two different respiratory structures: a gill for under water use and a lung for terrestrial use. They are mainly aquatic but lay eggs out of the water and can be amphibious.
Apple Snails
Apple Snail
Apple Snail
The Pomacea genus of Apple Snails is native to tropical South and Central America, the Caribbean and Florida. They are invasive in other areas. They have mainly golden brown, roundish shells with a milky white body but shells can be black, purple, yellow, orange and other colours and can be striped. Some are called "Mystery Snails" in aquaculture. They grow to 8cm diameter and eat plants.
Golden Apple Snails
Golden Apple Snail
Golden Apple Snail
In the row immediately above is the Golden Apple Snail, Pomacea canaliculata, native to Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay and Bolivia, but invasive in the USA. Like other members of its genus, the female lays batches of bright red eggs a foot or more (25cm) above the waterline to protect from predators. (Unlike some snails, Apple Snails are not hermaphrodite.)
Apple Snails
Florida Apple Snail
Florida Apple Snail
Immediately above is the Florida Apple Snail, P. paludosa, the largest freshwater snail in North America, its roundish shell growing to some 6cm diameter. It has the same long antennae as other apple snails. Its eggs are pink. Also native to Cuba and Hispaniola, it can survive in the dry season when water bodies dry up since it can breathe on land and close itself in its shell to keep moist. Drainage and pollution in the Everglades is reducing its habitat and population (along with population of its main predator, the Snail Kite).